Would Government Buyouts of Pharma Companies Really Be A Good Way To Lower Drug Prices?


Here’s a novel way to lower health care costs: make the US government a purveyor of drugs. In a recent
article in Forbes, Peter Bach and Mark Trusheim suggested that the US government could reduce drug costs by buying Gilead and distributing its hepatitis C medicines at a greatly discounted price. The idea, on the face of it, is an interesting one to consider. In their scenario, the government buys Gilead for a 30 percent premium on its current stock price, spending $156 billion. The government would then sell off the R&D operations as well as a strong franchise of HIV drugs, reducing the “net cost” down to $77 billion. Other financial adjustments reduce the price further, lowering the cost to treat each patient down to $15,733 from what they claim is the current cost of $42,000. This represents a pretty nice cost savings when spread out over a patient population of 3.2 million people (including about one out of every three people in prison). Gilead’s hepatitis drugs certainly rank at or near the very top of innovative medicines coming out of biopharma in the last 25 years. However, the Forbes article did not delve into some of the far-reaching ramifications of what government buyouts might mean to other players. Let’s take a deeper look below the surface to see what such a buyout might portend.
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