Rock Lyrics Predicted Drug Discoveries


Many people know that an eternal link exists between science and music. For example, Russian composer Alexander Borodin was as well known for his chemical work on aldehydes as his symphonies and string quartets. Many scientists have side careers, or at least hobbies, as musicians. These include NIH Director Francis Collins, who has entertained many people with his singing and guitar playing (note the inlaid mother-of-pearl double helix on the guitar’s fretboard).

Dr-Collins

What you may have missed is that many rock musicians, who’ve long been associated with illicit drug abuse, clearly envisioned numerous modern pharmaceutical innovations in their songs. I’m not talking about overt drug tracks like J.J. Cale’s Cocaine (popularized by Eric Clapton), the Beatles Doctor Robert, or the Rolling Stones’ Mother’s Little Helper. I’m talkin’ tunes that predated and anticipated later medicinal developments, as reflected in their lyrics. Let me share a few examples.
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BioPharma Haiku Round Four


This is my fourth collection of biopharma haiku. You can also follow these links to access my previous collections I, II, and III. I hope you enjoy them!

Medical update
Theranos now a zombie
Not dead or alive

Shkreli fraud trial
“Misunderstood genius” or
Liar, cheat, and thief?

FDA good news
“Yelp for drugs” will not happen
Moronic idea

The BCRA
Will McConnell find the votes?
When hell freezes over
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Summer Reading List 2017: Even More Tales to Inform and Amuse You


It’s time once again for my annual roundup of some of the best books I've read this year. As usual, my focus is on non-fiction tales from the world of science, medicine, and technology. A master list of all books that I recommend can be found here, and you can also check out my previous book recommendations from 2016 and 2015. Here's my latest list:
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So What Did the March for Science Accomplish?


In the words of a wise former colleague, “don’t know, can’t say.”

With this historic event only a week behind us, it’s going to take time to figure out if the March for Science accomplished anything significant. Part of this is due to the fact that its stated goals were rather
diffuse. Data, of course, needs to be collected, sorted, and analyzed, which will happen because the March was studied by a slew of sociologists. Turnouts at the more than 600 marches worldwide were high, with enthusiastic crowds displaying a diverse cornucopia of signs and slogans not usually paraded about in public. As far as I can tell, the marches were uniformly peaceful affairs, with no counter protesters demonstrating in favor of “alternative facts.” I also saw a number of people sharing religious points of view, happily conveying their opinions that one can believe in both God and science. There was even a group of Satanists marching; I didn’t know until visiting their website that they, too, take a pro-science stance.
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